January 29, 2012

Welcome to 2005

…that is, if you’re Dom Mason. Read through the article – it’s hilarious that it’s been published in 2012, with these types of 2005-esque quotes (also notice the awesome artsy photo with matching frame decals, t-shirt, and color-coordinated Swatch):

“The 29er is a packaging nightmare. You know exactly where you want to put all the centres and contact points for it to ride right but there are many physical barriers to doing that. Key areas to get right are chainstay length, BB height, stack height and trail. The large wheel size throws up all sorts of problems you just don’t get with a 26in wheel, like front mech, chainring and toe clearance.”

“A steep head angle keeps the trail dimension as close to a small-wheeled Maxlight as possible and ensures lively handling.”

“I found that by putting a 2.5° radius bend on the base of the seat tube I could increase mech clearance and tyre clearance, and shorten the stays to lighten up the front end.”

“We know 29ers are capable of steamrollering trails and going rather fast over the bumpy downhill stuff, so adding a dollop of legendary Maxlight handling into the mix might just lead to a trail destroyer!”

And then, my personal favorite:

“New thinking on geometry and vastly improved suspension forks, wheelsets, tyres, headsets and also the acceptance of 2×10 drivetrains has turned the idea of the big-wheeled bike from an eyebrow raiser into a really exciting new branch on the riding tree. Now it’s worth sitting up and taking notice.”

Translation: “Please, please let us on the bandwagon that we apparently missed half a decade ago. We desperately need to make money by selling something popular and we hear 29ers are popular. If everyone was riding 12-inch-wheeled Oscar Meyer weinermobiles, we’d try to make those too.”

As a side note, what the heck do 2×10 drivetrains have to do with 29ers suddenly becoming an “exciting new branch on the riding tree”?